Art Week Tokyo: Exhibitions to See

Source Credit:  Content and images from Ocula Magazine.  Read the original article - https://ocula.com/magazine/features/art-week-tokyo-2022-best-exhibitions-to-see/

Organised with the backing of Art Basel, Art Week Tokyo (3–6 November 2022) spreads over 50 venues this year, connecting museums, galleries, and art spaces across the city. Ocula Magazine shares its selection of must-see Tokyo exhibitions for the occasion.

Exhibition view: Andrew Salgado, Lotus Eaters, MAKI Omotesando, Tokyo (15 October–19 November 2022).

Exhibition view: Andrew Salgado, Lotus Eaters, MAKI Omotesando, Tokyo (15 October–19 November 2022). Courtesy MAKI.

Andrew Salgado: The Lotus Eaters
MAKI, 4-11-11 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku
15 October–19 November 2022

Andrew Salgado’s first exhibition in Japan stages a dreamland inspired by Homer’s 1614 epic Odyssey and its infamous lotus fruit eaters, who become dormant after ingesting the narcotic and lose the will to continue their journeys.

Alluding to remedies against the accelerated pace of contemporary life, the self-portrait Lotus Eater (2022) shows the artist crouched in a field of pink blossoms at night, with a piece of fruit dangling from his lips evoking the temptation of perpetual rest.

With equally rich hues and symbolism, Prometheus (The Modern Man) (2022) shows a man with a sutured body surrounded by crows and skeletons. He advances, cage in hand, reminding viewers that productive surges do not immortalise bodies against their inevitable ends.

Mitsuko Miwa, Salt House (2022).

Mitsuko Miwa, Salt House (2022). Courtesy SCAI The Bathhouse.

Mitsuko Miwa: Full House
SCAI The Bathhouse, Kashiwayu-Ato
1 November–10 December 2022

Aichi-based artist Mitsuko Miwa’s interest in pictorial space as a plane to unfold the imagination has amounted to distinct works over the years.

At the recent 2022 Aichi Triennale, the artist showed READ-MADE (1996), an aerial landscape of ten pages that merged the beginning and ends of novels at the top and bottom of the same surface, leaving the middle bare.

At SCAI The Bathhouse, Miwa visualises a dream house adapted to the gallery’s features, bringing together old and new works. Drawn along the walls and extending the dwelling’s checkered pattern to the ground, black and beige stones invite viewers to step upon their surface.

Kenjirō Okazaki, Announcement to Mac the Finger / How can this be since I do not know myself physically? /黙示 (2022). © Kenjirō Okazaki.

Kenjirō Okazaki, Announcement to Mac the Finger / How can this be since I do not know myself physically? / (2022). © Kenjirō Okazaki. Courtesy Blum & Poe. Photo: SAIKI.

Kenjiro Okazaki: TOPICA PICTUS Revisited Forty Red, White, And Blue Shoestrings And A Thousand Telephones
Blum & Poe, Harajuku Jingu-no-mori 5F
24 September–6 November 2022

Following a recent stroke, Kenjiro Okazaki believed he would never paint again. The artist’s ten-month long rehabilitation prompted a reflection on the mind-body connection, which is explored across small-scale abstract works at Blum & Poe.

Reflecting this state of disembodiment, abstract works like Announcement to Mac the Finger / How can this be since I do not know myself physically? /黙示 (2022) build upon the canvas with textured smears and recover the artist’s distinct use of the canvas frame.

A wooden border that is segmented in places and doubled in others opens gaps within the artist’s subtle suggestions, where dense strokes of canary yellow and dripping blues overlap with rose and white blends.

Exhibition view: Naofumi Maruyama, Kicking the Water, ShugoArts, Tokyo (24 September–5 November 2022).

Exhibition view: Naofumi Maruyama, Kicking the Water, ShugoArts, Tokyo (24 September–5 November 2022). Courtesy ShugoArts.

Naofumi Maruyama: Kicking the Water
ShugoArts, Complex 665 2F, 6-5-24
24 September–5 November 2022

Naofumi Maruyama’s soft landscapes are rendered from a process of spreading water on the canvas so that figures, colours, and shapes change as the artist paints. While more realistic than impressionistic, they are said to reflect image-making within fluid realities.

Quiet scenes show lone figures threading bodies of water, caught in whirlwinds of yellow and green. Vivid shades appear blurred and muted as they are absorbed into the cotton canvas, echoing the properties of water as a means to connect and transfigure.

In the triptych Kicking the Water (2022), a small figure on a paddleboard is depicted at different stages along the same blue-toned lake. Viewed together, they appear to gather different points along an ongoing reflection, opening its inquiry to the vast mountainscape.

Ryoji Ikeda, data.gram 36 [supercluster] (2022). ©︎ Ryoji Ikeda.

Ryoji Ikeda, data.gram 36 [supercluster] (2022). ©︎ Ryoji Ikeda. Courtesy TARO NASU.

Ryoji Ikeda: data.gram
Taro Nasu, Piramide Bldg. 4F
14 October–12 November 2022

Since 1995, electronic composer and visual artist Ryoji Ikeda has been fusing essential elements within sound and light to form a visual language for data and information, presented as audio-visual installations and performances.

Among notable works, the artist’s ‘data.verse’ trilogy (2018–2021) compiled data sets from NASA research and the Human Genome Project, galactic coordinates, and the structure of proteins, among other things, to form striking images of nature and space.

At Taro Nasu, Ikeda scales down with 13 video works that revisit data sets from the ‘data.gram’ series that draw from quantum mechanics, genetic information, and the universe.

Akiko Kinugawa, right and left (2022). Oil on canvas. 130.4 x 162 cm. ©︎ Akiko Kinugawa.

Akiko Kinugawa, right and left (2022). Oil on canvas. 130.4 x 162 cm. ©︎ Akiko Kinugawa. Courtesy ANOMALY.

Akiko Kinugawa and Sachi Hasegaw: Latencies
ANOMALY, 1-33-10-4F Higashi
29 October–26 November 2022

Capturing a transitional state, Latencies gathers paintings by Akiko Kinugawa, known for expressive portraits that amplify a moment of encounter, and sculptures by Sachi Hasegaw, whose abstractions are modelled after phenomena like time and memory.

Soft tones and smooth blends are prominent in the oil on canvas right and left (2022), which appears to abstract the family unit. Kinugawa depicts the latter as three interconnected round forms, with two larger pink and blue bulbs framing a smaller white shape.

Evading the confine of temporalities, Hasegaw’s granite sculpture Interspace (2022) features a coiled stone form with a dark chiselled surface. Short strokes appear to mark the passage of time; not entirely an artefact, nor totem of the future.

Hitoshi Nakazato, Teramo Diptych, Drawing A, left side (1985). Acrylic on paper. © Hitoshi Nakazato.

Hitoshi Nakazato, Teramo Diptych, Drawing A, left side (1985). Acrylic on paper. © Hitoshi Nakazato. Courtesy MEM, Tokyo.

On Mono, Koto, and Word – Eight Perspectives
MEM Tokyo, 1-18-4, Ebisu
2–27 November 2022

Eight artists inquire about the relationship between images, words, and speech in this group exhibition conceived around two Japanese concepts: mono, which refers to a perceivable object within space, and koto, an abstract object of thought.

Works by Tomoaki Ishihara, Shigeru Onishi, and Ryo Orikasa, among others, explore how language can connect or introduce new associations between mono and koto, either by incorporating words, extracting their meaning, or playing with the shapes of Chinese characters.

Speaking to the ongoing relevance of abstraction is painter and printmaker Hitoshi Nakazato’s forest-green grid Teramo Diptych, Drawing A, left side (1985). Chalk-white lines delimit three rectangles inside one another within the larger rectangular canvas.

Exhibition view: Takashi Ishida, Beyond the Garden, Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo (15 October–12 November 2022). © Takashi Ishida.

Exhibition view: Takashi Ishida, Beyond the Garden, Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo (15 October–12 November 2022). © Takashi Ishida. Courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery.

Takashi Ishida: Beyond the Garden
Taka Ishii Gallery, Complex665 3F, 6-5-24
15 October–12 November 2022

Tokyo-born artist and filmmaker Takashi Ishida constructs a forest of fretsaw-cut forms shaped after trees, and rogue vegetation that combine existing threads within his work.

Beyond the Garden began from the simple desire to transplant a tree inside the gallery space, only to extend into a significant ecosystem of quadrangular and circular shapes supported by tree branches.

Coiling lines and detailed geometric patterns generate a sense of movement, recalling the artist’s work in animation and sculpture.

Tarō Okamoto, Law of the Jungle (1950).

Tarō Okamoto, Law of the Jungle (1950). Courtesy Taro Okamoto Museum of Art, Kawasaki.

Tarō Okamoto: A Retrospective
Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum, 8-36 Ueno-Park Taito-ku
18 October–28 December 2022

Among post-war Japanese artists, Tarō Okamoto was somewhat of an icon. The artist was known for impactful paintings that fused Japanese symbols from ethnographic studies with abstract expressionist principles that spoke to his idea of art as an ‘explosion’.

In the case of Myth of Tomorrow (1968), a scatter of fleeing creatures and burning spectres live in the aftermath of an atomic bomb explosion. First commissioned for a hotel in Mexico, the mural was unveiled for the first time at Shibuya Station in Tokyo after being lost for 30 years.

The artist’s largest retrospective to date captures his journey from working in Paris at age 18 to his involvement with the Japanese avantgarde, and paintings made during his later years.

Shinro Ohtake, MON CHERI: A Self-Portrait as a Scrapped Shed (2012). Exhibition view: documenta 13, Kassel (2012). Commissioned by documenta 13. Photo: Yamamoto Masahito.

Shinro Ohtake, MON CHERI: A Self-Portrait as a Scrapped Shed (2012). Exhibition view: documenta 13, Kassel (2012). Commissioned by documenta 13. Photo: Yamamoto Masahito.

Shinro Ohtake
The National Museum of Modern Art, 3-1 Kitanomarukoen
1 November 2022–5 February 2023

Since 1977, Shinro Ohtake has been compiling scrapbooks of daily items including tickets, stubs, and posters as a form of self-documentation. Volumes of these material journals were shared with the world for the first time at the 2013 Venice Biennale.

The previous year at documenta 13, the artist dived into the visual influences of contemporary identity with a shed installation that contained paper images, objects, and sound, titled Mon Cheri: A Self-Portrait as a Scrapped Shed (2012).

Accordingly, the artist’s museum retrospective features over 500 works, from small handmade books to large-scale installations, organised according to seven core ideas that have informed the artist’s work. —[O]

Source Credit:  Content and images from Ocula Magazine.  Read the original article - https://ocula.com/magazine/features/art-week-tokyo-2022-best-exhibitions-to-see/