Shanghai Lowdown: Best Exhibitions to See

Source Credit:  Content and images from Ocula Magazine.  Read the original article - https://ocula.com/magazine/features/shanghai-lowdown-best-exhibitions-to-see/

As the once-lively Shanghai prepares to welcome Art021 and West Bund Art & Design (10–13 November 2022), Ocula Magazine shares notable exhibitions taking place across the city’s museums and galleries.

Exhibition view: Li Qing, Outline, Almine Rech, Shanghai (4 November–3 December 2022). © Li Qing.

Exhibition view: Li Qing, Outline, Almine Rech, Shanghai (4 November–3 December 2022). © Li Qing. Courtesy the artist and Almine Rech. Photo: Alessandro Wang.

Li Qing: Outline
Almine Rech, 2/F, 27 Huqiu Road
4 November–3 December 2022

Behind an antique window frame, the sun sets over Karamay in Xinjiang, northern China, where the alleged replication of Anish Kapoor‘s Chicago-based public sculpture Cloud Gate (2006) incited heated debates on forgery and authorship in 2015.

In Qing’s painting, three figures in traditional Uyghur costumes dance in front of the blue oval form. Behind them, a scatter of oil rigs reiterates the regional inspiration cited by artists commissioned to produce the work—modelled not after Cloud Gate, but oil bubbles.

Opening the scene for Li Qing’s new exhibition Outline, the poignant Kapoor in Karamay (2022) sheds light on the frameworks that have become the default when viewing art. Notably, that which congregates under the authority of the Western gaze.

Exhibition view: Richard Deacon, Harbour, Lisson Gallery, Shanghai (29 October 2022–14 January 2023). © Richard Deacon.

Exhibition view: Richard Deacon, Harbour, Lisson Gallery, Shanghai (29 October 2022–14 January 2023). © Richard Deacon. Courtesy Lisson Gallery. Photo: Alessandro Wang.

Richard Deacon: Harbour
Lisson Gallery, 2/F, 27 Huqiu Road
29 October 2022–14 January 2023

British sculptor Richard Deacon’s recent nature-inspired creations appear to have cast the fluctuations of ocean waves into mineral blocks of enticing emerald and granite shades.

Mirroring cycles of life and decay, the 1987 Turner Prize winner’s ongoing experimentations with diverse materials from laminated wood to polycarbonate, vinyl, cloth, and clay, seek to express new beginnings through material change.

At Lisson Gallery, rippling sculptures coated with glaze shimmer beside three stainless-steel sculptures titled At Sea… (2022). Together, they draw parallels between the act of art-making and navigating the vastness of the ocean, whereby the resulting work marks an arrival.

Exhibition view: Lee Bae, Souffle d'Encre, Perrotin, Shanghai (4 November–17 December 2022).

Exhibition view: Lee Bae, Souffle d’Encre, Perrotin, Shanghai (4 November–17 December 2022). Courtesy Perrotin. Photo: Mengqi Bao.

Lee Bae: Souffle d’Encre
Perrotin, 3/F, 27 Huqiu Road
4 November–17 December 2022

Lee Bae adopted raw charcoal as his primary material upon moving to Paris in 1990. The artist experimented with the material for over a decade, while reflecting on its connotations of spiritual cleansing in Korean culture through the burning of pine wood.

To express the material’s essence, Lee’s monochromatic canvases follow an intuitive painting process, often resulting in rich textures—at times embedded with chunks and shards—and broken and swerving lines delivered with a controlled hand.

Reflecting an evolution in the painter’s process, Lee’s ‘Brushstroke’ series (2020) at Perrotin Shanghai employ charcoal powder made from willow, pine, grapevine, and oak, resulting in rhythmic strokes that mirror the cadence of thought and breath.

Exhibition view: Mevlana Lipp, Haptic Memory, Capsule Shanghai (8 November–24 December 2022).

Exhibition view: Mevlana Lipp, Haptic Memory, Capsule Shanghai (8 November–24 December 2022). Courtesy Capsule Shanghai.

Mevlana Lipp: Haptic Memory
Capsule Shanghai, 1F, B16 Anfu Road, 275 Nong
8 November–24 December 2022

For her first solo exhibition in Asia, Mevlana Lipp recreates an Eden after dark where mystical botanical-plant reliefs recall the mythological universe of Hulu Wa (Gourd Brothers), an 1980s animation originating from Shanghai.

Mystical fauna and flora-inspired beings are depicted with sandy textures, translucent hues, and titles such as Shimmer (2002) to jolt the memory to our primordial relationship to nature.

Painting sensory experiences that visualise human affect, the near-transluscent, green-toned flower in Genesis (2022) opens its petals to reveal a purple stream reaching into a black ground.

Exhibition view: Group Exhibition, Hill of the Madman, Power Station of Art, Shanghai (5 November 2022–5 February 2023). © Power Station of Art.

Exhibition view: Group Exhibition, Hill of the Madman, Power Station of Art, Shanghai (5 November 2022–5 February 2023). © Power Station of Art. Courtesy Power Station of Art.

Art of Craft
Power Station of Art, 200 Hua Yuan Gang Road
5 November 2022–5 February 2023

Inquiring into the value of Chinese crafts today, two parallel exhibitions conceived as part of the ‘Next Cultural Producer’ programme, opens the medium’s present relevance to public debate.

Curated by Lixing Feng and You Wu, Hill of the Madman inquires into the practice of craft outside the framework of productivity through the work of 11 artists, including Jai Yuan and Youyu Ni, who employ its mediums as ways of knowing and seeing.

Back to the Future: Breaking the Time Barrier connects traditional craft to contemporary modes of production. Its rather optimistic outlook, conceived by Jin Zuo and Yanzhi Wang, highlights the practice as a way to generate ‘friendly frameworks’ of human cooperation and empathy.

Ani Liu, A Search for Ghosts in the Meat Machine (2018–2020). Video installation. Exhibition view: Entangled: bio/media, Chronus Art Center, Shanghai (30 July 2022–6 February 2023).

Ani Liu, A Search for Ghosts in the Meat Machine (2018–2020). Video installation. Exhibition view: Entangled: bio/media, Chronus Art Center, Shanghai (30 July 2022–6 February 2023). Courtesy Chronus Art Center.

Entangled: bio/media
Chronus Art Center, Bldg 18, 50 Moganshan Road
30 July 2022–6 February 2023

At Chronus Art Center, ten artists present new perspectives on synthetic bodies and artificial intelligence, reflecting shifts in understanding of bodies and biological processes prompted by biotechnology, when life forms can be generated using data, information, and code.

Arranged according to four chapters that reveal artworks along the way, the exhibition begins with the section ‘Transcoding’, which locates life within inorganic matter. Resin 3.D.-printed sculptures by Cao Shuyi here are modelled after living organisms, given a pedestal each.

Submerged inside a water tank, A Search for Ghosts in the Meat Machine (2018–2022) by Ani Liu follows, with side-by-side brain X-rays reflecting on the plasticity of consciousness and its replication via technology.

Exhibition view: OO ZONE, RAM Highlights 2022: The Good Life, Rockbund Art Museum, Shanghai (29 September–20 November 2022).

Exhibition view: OO ZONE, RAM Highlights 2022: The Good Life, Rockbund Art Museum, Shanghai (29 September–20 November 2022). Courtesy Rockbund Art Museum. Photo: Zhexuan Lu.

RAM Highlights 2022: The Good Life
Rockbund Art Museum, 1F, 20 Huqiu Road
29 September–20 November 2022

Questioning a timeless idea beginning from Aristotle and Ancient Greece, RAM’s fifth annual programme gathers diverse perspectives across creative fields to reflect on the ‘good life’ as a guiding principle for achieving a satisfactory life today.

Including works by artists, musicians, writers, designers, dancers, and chefs from 16 additional localities beyond Shanghai, the exhibition doubles as an investigation into the museum space and its relationship to different communities during turbulent times.

One can expect interactive spaces that contest utilitarian thinking and individualist cultures, an inquiry into the power of sewing by NZTT Sewing Co-Op, and a video documenting street performances with homeless communities in Brazil by Jonathas de Andrade.

Exhibition view: Pascale Birchler, The Pieces I Am, UCCA Edge, Shanghai (30 September 2022–8 January 2023).

Exhibition view: Pascale Birchler, The Pieces I Am, UCCA Edge, Shanghai (30 September 2022–8 January 2023). Courtesy UCCA Center for Contemporary Art.

The Pieces I Am
UCCA Edge, 2F, No. 88 Xizang Bei Road
30 September 2022–8 January 2023

Reflecting on the fragmented existence of contemporary life, where technology enables alternatives experiences of time and space, a group exhibition at UCCA Edge gathers 27 artists whose work employ or address the technological mediation of our daily experiences.

Dispersed within ‘narrative environments’ with titles like ‘Liquid Life’, ‘City of Mist’, and ‘The Lunar Sea’, artworks by Sun Yituan, Guo Cheng, Pascale Birchler, among others, are carefully positioned to amplify the concepts of their corresponding sections.

Embodying aquatic voyages or the fog of reality, notable works on view include Shao Chun’s pond assemblage of electronic fabrics and common objects, Guo Cheng’s divination site, and Ian Cheng‘s intelligent virtual creature, which cycles through life and death.

Bernard Buffet, Intérieur (1950). Oil on canvas. 196 x 270 cm. © Adagp, Paris. Photo: © Service de la documentation photographique du MNAM - Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI /Dist. RMN-GP.

Bernard Buffet, Intérieur (1950). Oil on canvas. 196 x 270 cm. © Adagp, Paris. Photo: © Service de la documentation photographique du MNAM – Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI /Dist. RMN-GP.

The Voice of Things
West Bund Museum, 2599 Longteng Avenue
28 July 2021–5 February 2023

Following the inaugural exhibition of Centre Pompidou x West Bund Museum Project, The Voice of Things traces the evolution of art within the Pompidou collection, from 20th-century perspectives like that of Picasso and Man Ray, to contemporary artists like Haegue Yang and Tatiana Trouvé.

From formal alterations to the first readymades, the Pompidou collection reflects the perceptual shifts within our understanding of art and the world it seeks to capture; from the introduction of photographic mediums, to attempts to merge art and design, form and function.

Following World War I, the Pop art and the Fluxus movements equally attested to the social and cultural shifts brought on by industrialisation, while capturing the search for spirituality, leading to the ‘individual mythologies’ permeating contemporary art today. —[O]

Source Credit:  Content and images from Ocula Magazine.  Read the original article - https://ocula.com/magazine/features/shanghai-lowdown-best-exhibitions-to-see/